Tag Archive: remediation

SSCI in Support of Armand Bayou EcoCamp

Educating the public on the importance of conservation efforts is key, and what better place to start than with our community youth. As a parent, I learned that teaching kids starts at home, and environmental awareness is very important as Earth’s population continues to grow and spread. I chose to enlighten my two children at Armand Bayou Nature Center’s Summer EcoCamp. They loved it so much last year that they wanted to participate again this year.  Armand Bayou Nature center provides for children ages 4-13 programs that encourage observation, problem-solving and creativeness in the natural setting of the wetlands. ABNC EcoCamp gets kids outdoors to demonstrate how wetlands affect humans and animals by featuring hands-on activities like seining at the bayou, pond dipping, and scat identification, which is very entertaining to school-age groups. My kids enjoyed the seining most of all because they caught a snail and made it their group mascot for the day.

Wetlands along coastlands, like here in the Galveston area, are one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth because it provides a wide variety of food, nutrients, and shelter to a wide variety of indigenous plants and animals, as well as migratory birds, but public knowledge needs to be increased. Wetlands function as a giant water filter, extracting harmful pollutants from the water that flows through them.  When it rains, wetlands help prevent flooding of rivers by holding onto excess water like a sponge; during a drought, wetlands provide water to surrounding areas to keep the trees and animals alive. Wetlands are also “Biological Supermarkets” because they support so much animal and plant life that are unique to this ecosystem. Humans are impacted by wetland functions in many ways; for example, they recharge underwater aquifers, a large source of the potable water we use and drink daily.

Environmental programs, such as those at ANBC, provide a fun and educational foundation to act locally, and think globally. If you are interested in sending your child to EcoCamp or would like more information,

please visit their website:http://www.abnc.org/education/summer-ecocamp.html

TCEQ 2016 Update to the Texas Risk Reduction Program (TRRP)

We just received the following update from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ).

We are pleased to announce the TCEQ updates to the Texas Risk Reduction Program (TRRP) Tier 1 Protective Concentration Levels (PCLs) are now available.

You can access these tables using the link: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/remediation/trrp/trrppcls.html.

We are releasing the 2016 PCL table update as a single Microsoft Excel workbook with each table on a separate worksheet.  We are also releasing the updates as a print only Adobe Acrobat portable document format (PDF) file.  The Excel file and the PDF file each contain PCL tables 1 through 10 and the supporting tables in the following order:

  • Summary of Updates
  • Table 1 – Tier 1 Residential Soil PCLs
  • Table 2 – Tier 1 Commercial/Industrial Soil PCLs
  • Table 3 – Tier 1 Groundwater PCLs, Residential and Commercial/Industrial
  • Table 4 – Tier 1 Residential Total Soil Combined PCLs
  • Table 5 – Tier 1 Commercial/Industrial Total Soil Combined PCLs
  • Table 6 – Tier 1 Individual Residential Soil PCLs
  • Table 7 – Tier 1 Individual Commercial/Industrial Soil PCLs
  • Table 8 – Tier 1 Individual Residential and Commercial/Industrial Groundwater PCLs
  • Table 9 – Individual Risk-Based Exposure Limits (RBELs), Residential
  • Table 10 – Individual Risk-Based Exposure Limits (RBELs), Commercial/Industrial
  • Toxicity Factors
  • Chemical/Physical Properties
  • Organic Carbon-Water Partition Coefficient (Koc) Values for Ionizing Organic COCs as a Function of pH
  • Gastrointestinal and Dermal Absorption Fractions (ABSGI and ABD.d Values)
  • 2011 List of Updates

The PCL tables updated in December 2015 were the most recent tables prior to this release.  A guide to the correct interpretation and use of the Tier 1 PCL tables can be accessed at the following link: http://www.tceq.texas.gov/publications/rg/rg-366_trrp_23.html

 

TCEQ Updates To The Texas Risk Reduction Program (TRRP)

We just received the following from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ).

We are pleased to announce the TCEQ updates to the Texas Risk Reduction Program (TRRP) Tier 1 Protective Concentration Levels (PCLs) are now available.

You can access these tables using the link: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/remediation/trrp/trrppcls.html

We are releasing the 2015 PCL table update as a single Microsoft Excel workbook with each table on a separate worksheet. We are also releasing the updates as a print only Adobe Acrobat portable document format (PDF) file. The Excel file and the PDF file each contain PCL tables 1 through 10 and the supporting tables in the following order:

• Summary of Updates
• Table 1 – Tier 1 Residential Soil PCLs
• Table 2 – Tier 1 Commercial/Industrial Soil PCLs
• Table 3 – Tier 1 Groundwater PCLs, Residential and Commercial/Industrial
• Table 4 – Tier 1 Residential Total Soil Combined PCLs
• Table 5 – Tier 1 Commercial/Industrial Total Soil Combined PCLs
• Table 6 – Tier 1 Individual Residential Soil PCLs
• Table 7 – Tier 1 Individual Commercial/Industrial Soil PCLs
• Table 8 – Tier 1 Individual Residential and Commercial/Industrial Groundwater PCLs
• Table 9 – Individual Risk-Based Exposure Limits (RBELs), Residential
• Table 10 – Individual Risk-Based Exposure Limits (RBELs), Commercial/Industrial
• Toxicity Factors
• Chemical/Physical Properties
• Organic Carbon-Water Partition Coefficient (Koc) Values for Ionizing Organic COCs as a Function of pH
• Gastrointestinal and Dermal Absorption Fractions (ABSGI and ABD.d Values)
• 2011 List of Updates

The PCL tables updated in November 2014 were the most recent tables prior to this release. A guide to the correct interpretation and use of the Tier 1 PCL tables can be accessed at the following link: http://www.tceq.texas.gov/publications/rg/rg-366_trrp_23.html

Don’t let mold make a move on your building

Like the rest of us, mold loves Houston. The warm, humid climate makes our city as natural a home for molds as it is for the energy industry.

At normal levels, mold is harmless. There are lots of types of molds that grow outdoors as well as indoors like inside your home and office building. The problem comes when moisture problems inside those structures cause mold to grow beyond normal levels.

“Normal levels” is a subjective term – even the government has yet to place regulations on what constitutes as natural levels or unhealthy levels.

If mold levels grow beyond minimum levels, the indoor air may become laden with mold spores at concentrations that are hundreds to thousands of times greater than outside. Contact with those high levels of mold spores, especially particular types such as Stachybotrys, can cause infection, allergies or toxic responses. Those little fungi can even cause structural damage to buildings.

Indoor mold infestation

Indoor Mold Infestation on Walls

How to prevent mold from growing

But no worries, there’s good news! You can proactively prevent mold from appearing – never mind becoming a problem. Here’s how:

  • Take a look around. Routinely inspect your property for mold. Where there is moisture, there could be mold. Be sure to give a deep inspection to the following areas:
    • Restrooms
    • Kitchens
    • Garages
    • Window seals
    • Water fountains
    • Ice machines
    • Around plumbing or water heaters
Mold Growth Around Piping

Mold Growth Around Piping

  • If you find mold, kill it. Small, moldy areas can be cleaned with bleach and water. Larger areas may require professional mold remediation.
  • Reduce the moisture.
    • Keep humidity levels below 60%, preferably 30-50%, by using an air conditioner or dehumidifier.
    • Do not carpet “moisture prone” rooms such as bathrooms, laundry rooms and kitchens.
    • Fix leaks immediately in plumbing, roofs, windows and other similar areas.
    • Install ventilation fans in restrooms/bathrooms.
    • Vent dryers to the outside of the building.
    • Take care of any water damage within 48 hours. The quicker water-damaged materials are dried out, the less severe the property damage. Remember, even small spills can foster mold growth.
    • Keep your foundation as dry as possible by sloping drainage away from the foundation.
  • Have heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems routinely inspected and maintained. Change the filters monthly. Consider using a high-efficiency filter and have the system professionally inspected annually. Ensure the inspection includes the air ducts, vents, drip pan, condenser, etc.
  • Mold inhibitors. Use cleaning products and paints that contain mold inhibitors.
  • Clean. Dust furniture, vacuum floors and clean kitchens and bathrooms weekly.

If you utilize these tips, you can out maneuver mold!

Need help?

Large mold-removal jobs might require a contractor to take care of the problem. That’s where SSCI comes in. Or we can help you create and implement strategies to prevent mold from forming or growing. Just give us a call, 1-800-324-7724.