SSCI Environmental

Founded in 1986, SSCI specializes in enhancing the environment through its sound solutions approach. “Getting the job done is priority number one, not prolonging our participation,” says Helen I. Hodges, President and CEO.

Learn More

SSCI News

SSCI supports Armand Bayou Nature Center

Martyn Farm Harvest Festival

 

Saturday & Sunday

November 10-11,2018 ~ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

LIVE DEMOS ~ FOOD ~ FUN ~ WAGON RIDES

Step into the past and join SSCI at the Armand Bayou Nature Center’s 38th Annual Martyn Farm Harvest Festival!

Learn about life on the Texas Gulf Coast Prairie and have some old-fashioned fun, including children’s games and crafts, a general store with homemade goodies, live demonstrations, handmade toys and crafts, wagon rides, music and dancers, butter-making with homemade biscuits, a pie-eating contest, food and drinks, baked goods, a raffle, and more!

38th Annual Martyn Farm Harvest Festival Flyer

Admission:

  • NON-MEMBER PRICES $12 for adults, $8 for kids (4-12) and seniors (60+)
  • MEMBER PRICES $10 for adults and $5 for kids (4-12) and seniors (60+).

On-site parking is $3. Free parking is available at UHCL lot D with a shuttle provided.
Purchase tickets at the gate or reserve your tickets online.

Baytown Wetland Delineation

As an Environmental Scientist at Separation Systems Consultants, Inc. (SSCI), Allyson Graziano performed a wetland delineation.  For two weeks, Allyson walked approximately 400 acres of land in Baytown, Texas near Cedar Bayou to locate and map out the wetlands in the area.  She saw many snakes, spiders, skinks, deer, frogs, cattle, horses and a large variety of plant species during their field work.  Together, they located eight wetlands, five tributary streams, two gullies and one bayou.  This was a large wetland delineation and one of the toughest Sites performed by SSCI.  The vegetation was thick, the streams were wide and deep, and the wildlife was abundant.
Allyson graduated from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology with a concentration in Resource Biology and Biodiversity.  She is in training to become a Wetland Project Manager at SSCI.  While performing the field work, she learned more about what a complex wetland delineation entailed and broadened her knowledge of options a Client has if a wetland is found in terms of permitting and mitigation.  SSCI regularly works with Clients to help with their natural resource needs and to resolve complex environmental, remediation and engineering issues.

 

 

 

 

 

League City Historical Society Dinner-2018

SSCI was in attendance at the annual League City Historical Living History Society’s Dinner;  this year’s theme was “The Great War” (World War I). The Society is a non-profit organization that promotes and preserves the history of League City, Texas. It’s annual Living History Dinner is a fundraiser SSCI has supported for over a decade; proceeds benefit historical society projects like the “One-Room School House” and the West Bay Area Common School Children’s Museum. This year, the Silent Auction featured fine art by local artists, basket prizes and vintage architecture items; I won a special pet gift basket that included grooming services, shampoo and pet treats.
It was a sight to behold at Butler’s Courtyard as Historical Society members dressed in period costume, and the historical guest speaker Jeffery Hunt spoke as a soldier of the 36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard). Mr. Hunt reminded us of the values created in the past, and what Americans have overcome as a state and as a country to get where we are today. The guest speaker closed thoughtfully from a WWI soldier’s point of view by asking the audience to remember what a great tragedy The Great War was, and his hopes that the devastation caused in its wake would not be repeated in the future. The audience was left to reflect on the fact that World War II would begin just 21 years later. For more information please visit the LCHS website:http://leaguecityhistory.org/

2018 SSCI Company Picnic

 

SSCI’s Annual Company Picnic was good, clean fun for our employees, their families, and friends. Every year the SSCI team gathers like family at Hodges’ Ranches for home-cooking and camaraderie. The occasion also gave the SSCI team a chance to get to know our newest team members on a more personal level. Office interactions become easier when employees find something in common with one another, and working relationships benefit by the acceptance of employees and their respective families It humanize those we see around the office and pays tribute to a more traditional form of social networking.The SSCI team and their respective families all came together in the relaxing environment, and the favorite activities among the kids included swimming and feeding horses.  Today, companies that organize family events are more likely to retain employees by investing in time spent with them outside of work to cultivate loyalty to the organization. In other words, the atmosphere creates a feeling of recognition and appreciation for employees and unites people with the company brand instead of chaining them to it. Like other contemporary businesses, SSCI  embraces this tradition, and the future remains bright.

SSCI in Support of Armand Bayou EcoCamp

Educating the public on the importance of conservation efforts is key, and what better place to start than with our community youth. As a parent, I learned that teaching kids starts at home, and environmental awareness is very important as Earth’s population continues to grow and spread. I chose to enlighten my two children at Armand Bayou Nature Center’s Summer EcoCamp. They loved it so much last year that they wanted to participate again this year.  Armand Bayou Nature center provides for children ages 4-13 programs that encourage observation, problem-solving and creativeness in the natural setting of the wetlands. ABNC EcoCamp gets kids outdoors to demonstrate how wetlands affect humans and animals by featuring hands-on activities like seining at the bayou, pond dipping, and scat identification, which is very entertaining to school-age groups. My kids enjoyed the seining most of all because they caught a snail and made it their group mascot for the day.

Wetlands along coastlands, like here in the Galveston area, are one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth because it provides a wide variety of food, nutrients, and shelter to a wide variety of indigenous plants and animals, as well as migratory birds, but public knowledge needs to be increased. Wetlands function as a giant water filter, extracting harmful pollutants from the water that flows through them.  When it rains, wetlands help prevent flooding of rivers by holding onto excess water like a sponge; during a drought, wetlands provide water to surrounding areas to keep the trees and animals alive. Wetlands are also “Biological Supermarkets” because they support so much animal and plant life that are unique to this ecosystem. Humans are impacted by wetland functions in many ways; for example, they recharge underwater aquifers, a large source of the potable water we use and drink daily.

Environmental programs, such as those at ANBC, provide a fun and educational foundation to act locally, and think globally. If you are interested in sending your child to EcoCamp or would like more information,

please visit their website:http://www.abnc.org/education/summer-ecocamp.html

SSCI Will be Celebrating Earth Day, April 21, 2018

SSCI will be celebrating Earth Day on, April 21, 2018 at the Party for the Planet  at Armand Bayou Nature Center.  Earth Day is an annual event created to celebrate the planet’s environment and raise public awareness about the environment.  The day, marked on April 22, is observed worldwide with rallies, conferences, outdoor activities and service projects. The first Earth Day was in 1970.  For more information about the history of Earth Day, visit Live Science.

Party for the Planet is being hosted by Armand Bayou Nature Center (ABNC) Board of Trustees.  ABNC stands out as one of the largest urban wilderness preserves in the United States, providing the community with exceptional educational, recreational, and health benefits of nearby nature. ABNC is planning for the future to ensure ecosystem preservation and to educate our community about preservation and the benefits of nature.  The Party for the Planet is on Saturday evening, April 21st with live music by Andy and the Dreamsicles.  The evening will be topped off with a catered dinner, dancing, charitable auctions, and games.

New Emergency Preparedness Training Requirements for Hospitals

The implementation date for the new training requirements is November 15, 2017.  The new rule establishes national emergency preparedness requirements that include adequately planning for disasters that fall on a continuum between disruptive to disastrous.  The new regulations apply to healthcare providers, including hospitals, critical access hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and long-term care facilities.  To find out more, please follow this link to Occupational Health and Safety magazine.  https://ohsonline.com/articles/2017/11/01/cms-emergency-preparedness-training.aspx

If you need assistance with assessing your training needs or if you are looking for a training provider, please contact SSCI at 800-324-7724 or visit our website at www.sscienvironmental.com or SSCI-HEALTH-SAFETY & TECHNICAL TRAINING_201509.

TIPS Consulting and Other Related Services Award

SSCI has been awarded a contract with The Interlocal Purchasing System (TIPS) care of Region 8 Educational Service Center.  SSCI’s contract extends through 2020!.  SSCI’s TIPS profile provides contract information and a listing of our services.  Our services include, but are not limited to, environmental site assessments; soil and groundwater investigations; asbestos/mold/lead surveys and abatement and management services; soil and groundwater remediation, risk-based assessment modeling and evaluation; engineering assistance and oversight; construction services; environmental compliance audits; hazardous and non-hazardous waste disposal; and natural resource assessments and investigations.

The Interlocal Purchasing System, better known as TIPS Purchasing Cooperative, began in 2002 as a small regional cooperative of the Region 8 Education Service Center (ESC).   Region 8 ESC is one of twenty Education Service Centers located strategically across the state of Texas.  The ESC’s serve primarily as intermediate education agencies bridging the gap between the Texas Education Agency and the more than 1,000 public school districts and charter schools located in the state.  TIPS is now a national operation. The Interlocal Purchasing System currently serves entities such as state and local governments and non-profit organizations, including but not limited to:

  •         K-12 school districts
  •         Charter Schools
  •         Private Schools/Daycare Centers
  •         Colleges and Universities (State and Private)
  •         Cities/Municipalities
  •         Counties/Parishes
  •         Churches
  •         Charitable Organizations
  •         State Agencies
  •         Emergency Services Districts
  •         Other entities with legislated purchasing/bidding requirements

Total Eclipse, August 21, 2017

On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, a total eclipse will cross the entire country, coast-to-coast, for the first time since 1918.  Check out when you’ll be able to see the solar eclipse at NASA.  NASA is sharing information on safe eclipse viewing with community centers, and citizen science projects are developing.  If you can’t watch Monday’s total solar eclipse, don’t worry. Another one will be visible in the U.S. in 2024.

According to NASA, the following materials should never be used to view a solar eclipse:

  • sunglasses of any kind
  • color film
  • medical X-ray film
  • smoked glass
  • floppy disks

 

The only way to safely view the Sun – eclipsed or not – is to either project or filter the Sun’s rays.  The pinhole projector is a quick DIY project.

You Need:

  • a long cardboard box or tube
  • scissors
  • duct tape
  • aluminum foil
  • a pin or a thumbtack
  • a sharp knife or paper cutter
  • a sheet of white paper

What to Do:

  1. Cut a rectangular hole at the end of the box. You can tape 2 boxes together to make a long box. The longer the box, the larger the projected image.
  2. Using the scissors, cut out a piece of the aluminum foil slightly larger than the rectangular hole. Make sure the foil is completely flat and not crinkled.
  3. Tape the foil over the rectangular hole in the box.
  4. Use the pin to poke a tiny hole in the center of the foil.
  5. Tape the sheet of paper on the inside of the other end of the box.
  6. Stand with your back toward the Sun. Place the box over your head with the pinhole towards the Sun. Adjust your position until you see a small projection, a reversed image, of the eclipsed Sun on the paper inside the box.

Using a Tube?

If you are using a long tube or taping 2 tubes together, cut the end of the tubes and tape the foil with a pinhole on 1 end. On the other end, tape a piece of white paper over the end of the tube. This will act as the screen. Close to this end, cut a rectangular hole using the knife. This will be your viewing window.

With your back toward the Sun, point the end with the foil toward the Sun, angling the tube along the Sun’s rays. Look into the tube through the viewing window until you see a reversed image of the eclipsed Sun on the screen.