Tag Archive: detention pond

SSCI in Support of Armand Bayou EcoCamp

Educating the public on the importance of conservation efforts is key, and what better place to start than with our community youth. As a parent, I learned that teaching kids starts at home, and environmental awareness is very important as Earth’s population continues to grow and spread. I chose to enlighten my two children at Armand Bayou Nature Center’s Summer EcoCamp. They loved it so much last year that they wanted to participate again this year.  Armand Bayou Nature center provides for children ages 4-13 programs that encourage observation, problem-solving and creativeness in the natural setting of the wetlands. ABNC EcoCamp gets kids outdoors to demonstrate how wetlands affect humans and animals by featuring hands-on activities like seining at the bayou, pond dipping, and scat identification, which is very entertaining to school-age groups. My kids enjoyed the seining most of all because they caught a snail and made it their group mascot for the day.

Wetlands along coastlands, like here in the Galveston area, are one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth because it provides a wide variety of food, nutrients, and shelter to a wide variety of indigenous plants and animals, as well as migratory birds, but public knowledge needs to be increased. Wetlands function as a giant water filter, extracting harmful pollutants from the water that flows through them.  When it rains, wetlands help prevent flooding of rivers by holding onto excess water like a sponge; during a drought, wetlands provide water to surrounding areas to keep the trees and animals alive. Wetlands are also “Biological Supermarkets” because they support so much animal and plant life that are unique to this ecosystem. Humans are impacted by wetland functions in many ways; for example, they recharge underwater aquifers, a large source of the potable water we use and drink daily.

Environmental programs, such as those at ANBC, provide a fun and educational foundation to act locally, and think globally. If you are interested in sending your child to EcoCamp or would like more information,

please visit their website:http://www.abnc.org/education/summer-ecocamp.html

Detention & Retention Pond Inspections

greyhound-02

The greyhound Takota is a former race dog who needed space to run! Takota is shown here running laps in a three-acre detention pond in Webster maintained by SSCI.

Read more about Takota in SSCI’s blog: A doggone good deed,

https://www.sscienvironmental.com/a-doggone-good-deed/

Separation Systems Consultants Inc. (SSCI) would like to remind you that the time is fast approaching to have your annual Detention/Retention Pond Inspection renewed to comply with your City’s Stormwater Enforcement Policy.

Retention Pond image

SSCI has worked with many Detention and Retention Pond owners in the City of Webster, the City of Clear Lake, and other municipalities on understanding and following the respective Stormwater Enforcement Policy. Our services include a pre-inspection, clean-up/problem consultation (if desired), a final inspection and a Professional Engineer’s seal, if applicable. This process allows you to become familiar with the components of detention pond “upkeep” that are required by the applicable city’s guidlines and policies.

Our Detention and Retention Pond services are detailed on our website at:  https://www.sscienvironmental.com/retention-detention-ponds/

Call or e-mail us for more information.

A doggone good deed

Takota the happy greyhound

Takota was a sad dog. A former race dog, the greyhound now lived in a small yard, and his owner, Les Tibbals, couldn’t find a fenced-in area big enough for him to really run.

Then Helen Hodges, president and CEO of SSCI, offered use of the fence-lined land around a one-acre detention pond that the company maintains in Webster, Texas. In exchange, Les is cleaning up trash on the site and has offered to mow.

Now the detention pond isn’t just protecting against flooding and downstream erosion. It’s become a new track for Takota to race around.

Takota the happy greyhound

After getting used to the space, Takota took off running laps around the pond and now looks forward to his regular trips to the field. “Thanks for allowing my buddy Takota a fenced place to run, and me to walk,” Les wrote to Helen.